News: wayfarer

We Tried Out for Shark Tank! See How it Went!

By Dallas Stevens

We Tried Out for Shark Tank! See How it Went!

So, we stumbled across a Shark Tank open casting call in Las Vegas right after the new year. We live/work in San Diego, so Vegas is only about a 5 hour drive. It felt like fate. We have made a ton of strides as a business in the last couple years, but we have a LONG way to go to be the leader in kids eye wear we want to be. I thought a Shark could help, and worst case scenario, I'd have a fun experience to blog about! Check out the quick video of how it went when I went to Vegas to audition our fun sunglasses for Shark Tank! While I obviously could not film myself pitching our awesome sunglasses, like these white and teal baby sunglasses, to the producers, I included the rough text of my 1 minute pitch below so you can picture it. Hope you find it interesting, it was really fun to do! We won't know how we did for a long time, so now we just sit and wait! 

Shark Tank Casting Call


Our Pitch (or close to it! Kind of a blur what exactly was said!)

Hi, I’m Scott, founder of Roshambo Baby. I am seeking a $X investment for X% of my company. Here’s the simple problem we solved: 50% of the lifetime UV damage done to your eyes occurs before the age of 10 years old. Despite that, the kids eyewear industry is full of cheap, breakable, frankly, ugly stuff largely made in China. It made me and my wife sad. We solved that by going to Italy and creating a line of matching baby, kids' and adult unbreakable sunglasses that can do this. [SHOW OFF HOW FLEXIBLE AND AWESOME THEY ARE!] Full damage and lens replacement guarantee, so light they float, certified safe for baby, BPA free, lead free, all that stuff. You can drive over these in your car and chances are they’ll be fine. Trust me, we’ve done it.

But that’s not the only reason I am here. The reason I have like permanent jazz hands about the unlocked potential of my company is because while our frames can also do this, they can also do this [PULL OUT A PAIR OF SHADES WITH A PRESCRIPTION LENS IN THEM!].... all of our frames are prescription friendly and kids can swap out their prescription lens for a new frame color every day if they want to! There is nothing quite like our product on the optometry market. We launched an affordable prescription fulfillment service on our website last year to rave reviews from parents. We are at the tip of an iceberg. Think Warby Parker for kids.                                           

We are poised to take this innovative product to a wider audience. I want to be the market leader in children's eyewear because Little People Deserve Big People Shades. But I need a shark to get there.

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Parenting without Saying No

By Dallas Stevens

by 

 

Parenting is a delicate balance of knowing how to raise your kids with integrity while also preparing them for the real world.

Sometimes this means doing things that seem counter-intuitive to make sure our kids are actually hearing what we are saying and learning from situations.

Something that I learned from teaching and in the first couple of years of parenthood is that opportunities to talk to children without saying no is so important. Now as a mother of two, parenting without saying no, don’t, and stop is an important part of my every single day.

 

Parenting without saying no and creating boundaries for our children with intentional wording. 

Sometimes it’s hard to admit that hearing no is really tough. And in a very real sense, I by no means want my children to grow up without having ever been told no and my kids still hear no on a daily basis. It is absolutely part of life and one I want them to hear.

However, I have drastically cut down on its use in our home by saying no without actually using the word. And in cutting down, it has made use of the word more effective for us. So why would I advocate for adopting the “parenting without saying no” approach?

Very simply… because they listen better.

The way we are hard wired as humans is to listen to the sentence structure. We sometimes hear the first part of a sentence, almost always hear the last part, but rarely hear the middle unless we have our complete attention on the person talking to us. And really, what young child is giving us their undivided attention at all times?

Beyond just the way we hear, it’s also important for all of us to have clear directions. If we are given vague instructions, it leaves a lot of gray area. This is because there are a thousand alternatives to “not” doing something, but only one course of action that should be done when told specifically what to do.

So why would we not want to stop saying no to kids and adopt a system that helps our children listen to us better? Or be more obedient?

Read about and listen to my podcast episode on the power of saying MAYBE.

So how do I remove negative words when talking to my child?

It’s really easy to say no… WAY too easy. So it’s not going to be a cake walk to retrain your mind to ditch negative words and actions like “no”, “stop”, “don’t”, “can’t”, etc. but it is possible. It took me a long time and I am still not perfect. It’s all about practice.

Instead of saying “I can’t talk right now” when I am waiting on hold on the phone and my daughter comes to ask me a question, I say “I am on the phone right now. I can talk to you in a little bit”. I do this because I am focusing on what she is going to hear. If she is not giving me her undivided attention, she may only hear “talk right now”. Instead, I want her to hear “on the phone” and “in a little bit”.

Related: Need help navigating your child’s behaviors?

Likewise, if my daughter is in danger and is too close to the street I am not about to yell “Don’t go in the street!” because I don’t want her to hear the last half of it. I want her to hear “Come here please!” or “Move away from the street!”

Alternatives to saying no & using negative language with kids

There are numerous examples I could give, but thought some of the best were in the image above. We have also replace “don’t touch” with “please keep your hands to yourself”/”please keep your hands in your pockets” (we go to antique stores a lot).

And my husband is working on not using “my ears don’t hear whining” because she has shut down too many times. Instead, we encourage her to use her words and express her emotions in a way that we can understand.

Read more from Parents with Confidence about adapting your parenting style to your child’s needs.

Is it possible to discipline without saying no?

Yes! This has everything to do with the idea of being intentional with our words and giving clear instructions to our children. Using positive phrasing actually has the ability to set clearer boundaries than the word no itself.


Magda Gerber once said “A child who is never told “no” is a neglected child.” And I completely agree, but sometimes it’s also more about how we tell them no, rather than the word itself! We must affirm what our children need to do. Rather than discipline and teach them by telling them what not to do, it’s a lot easier to tell them exactly what we want them to do. In telling a child not to hit, maybe he thinks “Well can I kick?”

When my daughter threw a small wooden ball and it hit me in the forehead instead of saying “NO! Don’t throw that!” I simply said “Ow! That really hurt. Please keep your toys in your hands.”

In the end my parenting has become much more intentional by using negative language and “no” less and coming up with a more positive approach. It makes the power of “no” retain its meaning and has created clear boundaries for my children.

Get the Positive Discipline Cheat Sheet

Need help reframing how you see or respond to situations with your kids? This cheat sheet will help you through some of those tough moments when you want to react with frustration instead of love. The sneak peek is below, but be sure to subscribe to download the full, printable version!

 

 

Watch this response to many of your questions & concerns about reducing negative parenting language.

 

**Edited for Author’s Notes:

 

  • The list provided is simply a visual to help say no less. In fact, that is the thesis of my article. In no way have we ditched the word “no” forever. It’s all about finding alternatives and choices, especially in the hard moments as a parent when nothing is working.
  • Also, the phrasing of “negative language” and “positive language” simply refers to the grammatical English term in that the sentence is or is not negative.
  • For more responses, such as one to the “we will not buy that” alternative, please watch the video. It explains how we say no, divert attention, and create boundaries with our words. Thank you all for your great feedback and responses!

www.roshambobaby.com

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10 Phrases to Help You Develop a Growth Mindset in Parenting

By Dallas Stevens

By 

One shift in thinking has drastically improved my parenting, and that is moving from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset about being a mom. This growth mindset says – you are always learning and it’s never too late to make a more positive choice. When you make a mistake it’s not an indication that you are doomed to be a failure; it’s an opportunity to grow.

The concept is easy enough to understand, but changing the thinking habits I had wasn’t as simple. One of the interesting things about growth mindset that Carol Dweck states in her book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, is that we can have a growth mindset about one area of life, but not another – that’s how I was about parenting. I had a growth mindset about things like creativity and academic learning. However, when it came to parenting, I expected myself to be a natural at being a mom.

I felt so awful about making mistakes in parenting. I’d feel so terribly guilty that I could barely make room for more positive, growth oriented thoughts. However, over time I discovered certain phrases that would quiet down the negative judgmental inner voice and allow me to learn instead of getting stuck in a place of depression and hopelessness. Here is a collection of 10 helpful tips about the growth mindset for parents.

If you’d like to be reminded regularly of ways to have a growth mindset, connect with your kids and communicate effectively, make sure you sign up here to get an invite to Bounceback Texts.

10 Phrases to Encourage a Growth Mindset in Parenting

  • Always learning – short and simple, you can think about this phrase to remind yourself that it’s healthy to be in the process of learning, you don’t have to know everything.
  • Connection, not perfection – this is my personal favorite growth mindset phrase for  remembering the priority in my relationships is connection, not getting every detail perfect. It is useful to think when I find myself getting stressed about a family event not going as planned, when I want to support a friend and don’t quite know the right words, or when I find myself waiting for just the right time to talk or play with my kids. Connection, not perfectionnudges me towards what matters most.
  • I’m in tune with my kids and I can make adjustments to our routines when needed. Have you ever felt like a failure when your perfectly worked out routine falls to pieces? It’s helpful to  remember that your job is actually paying attention to this and making a change.
  • This used to work for us (or I thought this would work for us) but I am empowered – I can make a change when things aren’t working. It can be hard to have a growth mindset when something you thought would be perfect for your family….isn’t. We put a lot of store in parenting choices like schooling, breastfeeding, foods we feed our kids, childcare, sleeping arrangements and so on. It’s not to say the way we handle these decision isn’t important, they are. However it is a mistake to believe there is one right way and if you find it everything will be great. Sometimes we have to make a change, and it can be humbling and scary, but holding on to patterns that don’t work for your family is no way to be a leader. Which leads us to another phrase that helps you have a growth mindset about parenting…
  • It takes strength and wisdom to recognize you need to change course, and then take action to make that change. 
  • I made a mistake and I am a big enough person to learn from it and move forward instead of clinging to something that isn’t working. Sometimes it stings to admit we were wrong, but compounding a mistake by clinging to something that isn’t working for you isn’t the answer. Learning from it and moving on is freeing.
  • It’s never too late to make a more positive choice. Sometimes I’ve been caught up thinking that everything is a mess – why bother? This phrase reminds me that making a more positive choice is always an option.
  • I can change directions. I can start over from now. Some days we need a do-over. Permission granted. You can start over from now.
  • I am a work in progress and this is part of that progress. It’s great to have a vision of where you want to be, but sometimes it’s easy to forget that the process of learning and growing has great value. You are someone valuable right now.
  • I always have potential for growth. Yes you do – you are not too old, too broken, too dumb. You have potential for growth. It’s helpful for me to remember I am not stuck being one particular way; through effort and time I can change if I wish.
  • What have I learned from this? Reflecting on what you’ve learned, even from the most uncomfortable situations, helps you grow.
  • Mistakes mean I’m learning. I always loved the song my Dad would sing to me when I was a kid that had a chorus that said, “Oops, you made a mistake, and you’re beautiful to me.

What phrase do you like to say to yourself to help you remember that you don’t have to be perfect?

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The Most Instagrammable Onesies For Your Sweet Baby

By Gen Cohen

If you can't get enough of the serious baby style* that graces your Instagram feed, we're totally with you. There are a ton of small businesses that make the most precious onesies for babies, which in turn make photos of babies that much more adorable (bet you didn't think that was possible!). We're sharing some of those onesies with you so that your photos can be the ones to pop up on other peoples' feeds to make them say, "Damn, that's a cute baby in a cute onesie."

Scroll through for fun onesies that you'll want your little babe to be wearing during their next iPhone photo shoot.

*Don't forget about mama Instagram style!

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18 Tips for Traveling with Baby

By Gen Cohen

Have a fun and stress-free vacation with baby by navigating on-the-go naps, time differences and cramped hotel rooms

By Colleen Lanin, Originally published on parenting.com

Does "vacationing" with your baby sound like an oxymoron? As someone who has ventured on road trips, beach getaways, cruises and more with my two kids, and who is writing a book about family travel—The Travel Mamas' Guide—I know that vacations now are not as easy as they were prebaby. And while there are tons of tips on how to get there, there's not much advice for how to manage once you arrive. A few simple tricks have saved some of my family's trips.

Strategic Unpacking

Just as important as what you pack—and you can check out get-ready checklists here—in my opinion, is how you unpack.

Do it immediately

As soon as you arrive (unless someone in the family is overly cranky or tired), set up your room to make it as close to home as possible. Put the baby in the playpen or hotel crib with a pile of toys and occupy an older kid with a coloring book. Or have your partner take the older sibling out to get the lay of the land while you unpack. Settling in will help you remain organized (and sane) throughout your stay.

Designate a baby-changing station

Bring a box of wipes, lay out a changing pad (I like to put a disposable changing pad on top of a hotel towel) and stack a bunch of diapers in one area. That way, you won't need to chase down the diaper bag when that first big poop occurs.

Create a play space...

Stash toys and books on a low shelf or in a drawer, or keep all the playthings in one corner. Creating a place for your baby to play will make the room feel homey and keep it from looking like a disaster area.

...and a kitchen

Even if your room doesn't have a kitchen or bar area, establish a spot where you'll keep bottles, dishes, baby food, snacks, formula and dish soap. Sometimes the bathroom is best if it has the only sink in the room.

Napping Smarts

Your baby needs her naps, but you don't want to spend your whole vacation watching her snooze. Follow these strategies for squeezing in that daytime sleep:

Start walking

When my daughter, Karissa, was a baby, she wouldn't nap in a strange crib while on vacation. So we planned our days around taking long walks with her napping in a stroller. Some momsadvise bringing the lightest, most compact umbrella stroller on vacation to save room, but I always pack a stroller that reclines completely to make stroller slumber easier.

Wear your baby

If your baby doesn't sleep well in a stroller, try a front carrier (like the BabyBjorn) or baby backpack. If you've never used one at home but think it might be convenient on vacation, try it out a few times before you leave. Not all babies will like it, and it might be too hard on your back.

Go for a scenic drive

Try taking leisurely drives to check out the area while your baby naps in the car seat. And on some trips, you can coordinate drive time between destinations with sleep time.

Take turns nap-sitting

If your tot isn't an in-transit sleeper, don't be afraid to schedule naps back in the room. While it's a different vacation rhythm than you're probably used to, an a.m. break and midday siesta can be relaxing for you, too. Just consider your baby's napping style when booking accommodations; if you'll need to return to the room often, a hotel near the beach may be a better bet than a spot farther away, even if it's a bit pricier. If you can, book a room with a balcony or patio so the parent "on duty" can enjoy the outdoors, too.

Easier Bedtimes

One of the most worrisome things about traveling with a baby is getting your tot to sleep in a new place. Here's how to up your odds of at least a few peaceful nights:

Do some trial runs

If you're bringing a portable travel bed, have your baby sleep in it for a few nights before you leave. That way, it will feel like a familiar, comfy spot to go night-night on vacation.

Give it a few days

While it can be tempting to throw in the blankie and drive home in the middle of a sleepless vacation night with an inconsolable baby, I implore you to power through. Eventually, babies will adjust to their new surroundings and schedule, and sleep. If you can survive a couple of nights, I am (almost) willing to promise happy vacation days ahead.

Book the right room(s)

If bedding down in the same room means no one will get any sleep, consider booking a suite or connecting rooms. A suite may offer the convenience of a kitchen area, but connecting rooms may afford more space at a cheaper price.

Stick to the routine

If your baby's bedtime ritual at home includes a bath, lullabies and a bottle, do the same on vacation to make up for the change in location.

Get adjusted

Instead of expecting your infant to shift her internal clock and adjust to a new time zone, shift your day: Stay up later or get up earlier than usual by a few hours.

Meals on Wheels

Sampling local cuisine and splurging on restaurant meals are vacation pleasures I refuse to give up. Dining with babies can be done.

Breakfast in Bed

Because our times to swim, hike, shop or visit an aquarium are limited by morning and afternoon naps, it makes sense for the entire family to eat something quick in the hotel room. So we pack plenty of ready-made breakfast foods like mini-bagels, cereal bars and fruit (bananas, apples).

BYOF

If your baby drinks formula, it helps to pack more than you think you'll need. To save space, empty powdered formula into zipper-lock plastic bags. Or order heavy staples like diapers and formula—even baby shampoo—from a site such as diapers.com or Babiestravellite.com that will ship to your destination (and since you won't have to carry the formula, consider splurging on the ready-to-feed type).

Nurse wherever you feel comfortable

You can breastfeed anywhere you are legally allowed to be.

Bend the rules

To enjoy dinners out, you may have to encourage what you would normally consider bad behavior. I don't let my kids watch TV while eating at home, but we always bring portable DVD players when we eat out. Putting on some Sesame Street for them allows us to actually taste the food we're shelling out big bucks for.

Eat early

Sure, a romantic dinner would normally be at 8 p.m., but by dining out at 5:30, you'll likely have an empty restaurant, room to park your stroller, and a short wait for your food. Alternatively, if your newborn loves to sleep in her car seat, make later reservations and then feed her a bottle or nurse her while you wait for your appetizers. Hopefully, she'll be out for the rest of the meal.

 

Now, go enjoy! Toss out all your old ideas about what a vacation should be and embrace the new craziness that is traveling with a baby. Laugh at the fact that you're at the local playground by 6 a.m. and in bed for the night at 8 p.m. Consider all the gear and baby-lugging as great vacation exercise. And then savor going back home to "regular" life that much more.

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22 Outdoor Activities Perfect For Fall Weekends

By Gen Cohen

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4 essentials for a second baby

By Gen Cohen

4 essentials for a second baby

We’ve chatted SECOND BABY REGISTRY GUIDE already, but today I’m here to cover the four essentials you absolutely need when you’re expecting baby #2. Sure, everything on the registry guide will make your life easier, but I’m talking about the down and dirty four things you absolutely cannot live without if you value your sanity and your baby’s happiness. Ready?

 

 

1. A swing, bouncer, baby chair, etc.: If this is your second baby, chances are you’re already chasing around another child–washing hands, making snacks, general “parent-of-a-toddler” stuff. You’re going to want a swing or rocker to put your baby down in. Somewhere safe and off the ground (so said first child can’t accidentally step on the baby) and somewhere that will entertain or soothe her. With Oscar I had the 4MOMS MAMAROO and I found it to be far superior to any chair or swing I used with Harry. That little contraption bought me tens of minutes at a time when I needed to put Oscar down to tend to Harry stuff.

2. A good wrap or carrier: Going off that thread, you’re going to find there are times when your baby just wants to be held. Remember that from baby #1? I remember working through Harry’s late nap with him laying on my shoulder. But the second time around, things are a little different. A good wrap or carrier is worth it’s weight in gold (and then some because if it’s really good it won’t weigh much). My favorites are our SOLLY BABY WRAP and our WILDBIRD SLING.

3.A double stroller: You’ve got two kids now, so it’s might be time to upgrade your stroller. A good double stroller will make your trips to the store, your jogs, your zoo field trips, etc. easier. We actually have two different double strollers, but that may not be necessary based on the ages of your children and your lifestyle. I use a BOB SE REVOLUTION DOULIE for my runs and our walks around town and I keep ourUPPABABY VISTA in the car and take it anytime we travel. I love them both!

4. Diapers: If it seems obvious, that’s because it is. But that doesn’t mean you don’t need diapers! If your older child is already potty trained, you’ll want to get back into the habit of picking up a pack or two of diapers when you’re shopping–or you can bust out the old CLOTH DIAPERS. If you’re still changing older sibling’s diapers, you’re going to want to think about doubling up and what that means for you in terms of gear. Definitely more diapers, wipes, and maybe even a second changing station?

It’s kind of surprising both A) how much you have everything you already need for baby #2 and B) how little you actually need! What do you think–did we cover everything? Anything else you would add to the “essential” list?

 

 

...and of course, our ro•sham•bo baby sunglasses ;)

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how to stay cool with baby this summer!

By Gen Cohen

17 Items for Keeping Cool This Summer

Nursery Items

HALO Cotton Muslin Sleepsack ~ $20

For hot summer nights, a lightweight wearable blanket (or swaddle) is a must for little ones who still need something to cover them. 100% cotton muslin fabric is breathable and very lightweight.

buy-now

Lasko Baby-Safe Tower Fan  ~ $61

Tower FanIf your nursery doesn’t have an overhead fan, we recommend this blade-less tower fan.

Safe for little fingers, an oscillating fan is also great because it circulates air without concentrating it in one spot. We also love that it helps with air quality. Remote included.

*Note this is just a fan, not an air conditioner.

 

buy-now

 

Baby Carriers

Just because it’s hotter than h*ll outside, doesn’t mean you should stop babywearing. Here are the carriers that we love for summer —

ventus-baby-carrier

Ergobaby Ventus

Ergobaby Cool Air Mesh/Performance Carriers ~ $120+

For babywearing in a warm/hot climate, I highly recommend the Ergo Performance line. They offer the “Cool Air Mesh Performance” carrier ($120), the “Performance Ventus” carrier (for ultimate ventilation) ($123) and the “360 Cool Air,” which is the regular 360 (which allows outward facing), but mo’ meshy ($180).

These carriers are all moisture-wicking and super breathable. The fabric is machine washable and fast drying. *Read more about why we love Ergobaby carriers here.

buy-now

Lillebaby Complete All Seasons ~ $140

Get more bang for your buck with the Lillebaby All Seasons carrier. In hot weather, zip down the front flap to allow air through the meshy back area. In the wintertime, zip it back up to keep baby warm in cold weather. For year-round warm climates, check out their new line of Airflow carriers.

Options, people!!

*Read in-depth review of this carrier here.

Lillebaby All Seasons Carrier

buy-now

Beachfront Baby Wrap ~ $40

This super light and stretchy infant wrap is made of performance athletic mesh, which is extremely breathable, lightweight and fast-drying – you can even babywear in the water. These are SO cool, I wish I knew about them when my littles were little!!

beachfront baby wraps

It’s also great for moms with older kid(s) that need an extra hand in the water. Perfect for everyday use as well. Comes in wrap and ring sling versions.

buy-now

Car Seat & Stroller Accessories

The interior of a car can get up to 170° on a hot day, which leaves every surface as hot as lava. The darker your car seats, the hotter they will get. Here are some tools for keeping your little ones cool(er) in the car and stroller.

Newbie Shade ~ $25

Don’t let the sun get between your baby and a much-needed car nap (right??).

The Newbie shade is low-profile, low-tech and easy to attach to the front and rear headrests. Made of 100% cotton, it blocks UV rays, works in nearly any vehicle and doesn’t interfere with the driver’s line of sight.

Enter promo code LUCIESLIST for 20% off at checkout through 9/22/16.

buy-now

Muslin Car Seat Cover ~ $15+

For infant car seats: muslin car seat covers are airy, breathable, and keep direct sun out of baby’s eyes. There are so many out there, it’s hard to pick just one. Check out the many options that are available at various price points.

buy-now

Brica Infant Car Seat Cover ~ $23

The highly-rated Brica infant car seat cover does double duty: it has mesh (to keep the bugs away) and a retractable sun & rain cover that blocks all UV rays. Oh, and it protects baby from unwanted touching 😉  *Fits all major car seat brands.

Brica Car Seat Cover

buy-now

Protect-A-Bub Convertible Car Seat Shade

And for the convertible car seat, Protect-A-Bub makes a cover for your older kiddo. Rated UPF 50+ and doesn’t retain heat.

*Click here to find a retailer in your area. Not so easy to find…

Protect a bub car seat shade

buy-now

Jolly Jumper Stroller Sunshade ~ $15

Strollers come with a built-in canopy, but most of them don’t cover your entire kiddo. We like the Jolly Jumper sunshade because it fits most strollers, play yards and protects against UV rays. Keeps bugs out too!

Jolly Jumper Stroller Sunshade

buy-now

Cool Mee Seat Liner by Meeno Babies

Cool Mee Seat LinerTypical car seats have a solid back surface or a cushion with material that isn’t vented, so setting a layer of vented material between the car seat or stroller and the child reduces sweating and overheating. In a hot, hot car, it may not guarantee against any sweating, but it sure does help.

One user noted that Meeno Babies car seat liner reduced surface temperature by about 18 degrees in the shade and 15 degrees in direct light (yes, he measured with a thermometer).

*Universal size fits most. Be sure this liner (or any other item) doesn’t interfere with harness placement and tightness. Harnesses should always be snug enough that you can’t pinch any material (95% of parents don’t have their kids harnessed tightly enough anyway — just saying).

Enter code staycool at checkout to get 20% off MSRP each unit until July 31st. Includes free shipping in the USA!

Dreambaby Stroller Fan ~ $13

Stroller fans don’t give off a ton of air, but it’s just the right amount for little ones. Bonus: it doubles as a sound machine 😉

*Another option is a handheld spray bottle fan; check out this one by 02cool. For the heavy duty user, check out this pump mister.

Dreambaby Stroller Fan

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Car Sunshades by Veneev ~ $12 (2-pack)

Window clings keep direct sun out of eyes and help keep the temperature down. *Be sure they don’t interfere with the driver’s line of sight.

These are the highest-rated shades on the market and use static to stick to your window without leaving residue. They protect from UV rays and provide a SPF 30+ protection. Note that you have to remove the cling in order to roll the window down.

*Check out Enovoe for larger cars.

Window Cling

buy-now

The Noggle Air Conditioner Extender ~ $46

These funny-looking air hoses are called Noggles and parents swear by them. They deliver air to anywhere in your car, especially to rear-facing kiddos who don’t get direct ventilation.  Works with a/c in the summer and heat in the winter, huzzah! Great for older cars that don’t have back seat vents.

*Note: You’ll need the 6′ for forward-facing in the backseat, the 8′ for rear-facing, and the 10′ for a car seat in the 3rd row.

buy-now

Cooling Garment

Cooling Towel by Ergodyne ~ $8

More tools for keeping cool: the best-selling Cooling Towel by Ergodyne. All you need to do is wet it (run it under the tap for one minute), and you can re-use it throughout the day. Bring this one to Disney in August, you won’t regret it.

Cooling Towel

buy-now

Insulated Cups

Polar Bottle Kids Insulated Bottle ~ $7.99

This affordable plastic bottle uses special insulated foil to keep liquids cold. Unlike heavy stainless steel water bottles, this one’s easy for little ones to drink from and the opening is large enough to fit ice. We have 3 and use them almost daily.

      • BPA and Phthalate free, dishwasher and freezer safe

polar bottle insulated

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Thermos Funtainer 12 oz ~ $15

Drinking lukewarm water in the heat is no fun. The Thermos Funtainer is highly-rated and for good reason — it’s vacuum insulated for up to 12 hours (for cooling only).

*Thermos also makes a Foogo 10 oz for $16 (similar) and a Foogo 7 oz spouted with handles ($19) for little ones. [Related: Favorite Sippy Cups]

Thermos Funtainer

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Hydro Flask Insulated Water Bottle ~ $50

Another very highly-rated insulated bottle (but for triple the cost), is the Hydro Flask. It keeps drinks cold for up to 24 hours AND it keeps drinks hot for up to 6 hours.

      • For every bottle purchased, Hydro Flask donates 5% back to a charity of your choice.

Hydro Flask

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That is all — enjoy!!

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