News: pediatrics

36 of the Best Gifts For Infants (besides our shades)

By Gen Cohen

Baby's first holiday or birthday can't pass unnoticed. Though they may have more fun with the box than anything in it, there are still plenty of fun gift ideas to add to their toy chest. From activity gyms and bead toys to an adorable rocker and the softest play mat ever, here are our 36 favorite baby gifts for this year!

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THE HAPPIEST BABY: DR. KARP'S 10 TIPS TO GET YOUR BABY TO SLEEP

By Gen Cohen

Image Source: Flickr user alphaone

There are few subjects that get new parents riled up as much as talking about their baby's sleep (OK, and maybe their poop). However much they're getting, it isn't enough and they're not sure how to get their tot to sleep more. "Sleep deprivation is the number one problem you face as the parent of a young child," says Dr. Harvey Karp, author of the wildly popular The Happiest Baby series of parenting guides, including his latest book, The Happiest Baby Guide to Great Sleep: Simple Solutions For Kids From Birth to 5 Years ($16).

According to Dr. Karp, "Sleep deprivation is a horrible nuisance at best; at its worst it can lead to marital conflict and postpartum depression. It makes it hard for you to lose your baby weight because you're exhausted, so you're overeating and not exercising. It leads to breastfeeding failure because you're just so tired that you give up on it and even to unsafe sleep behavior because you get so tired, you just bring your baby in bed with you. You would never go to bed with your baby if you were drunk. But studies show when you're getting six hours of sleep a night or less, you're the equivalent of drunk. So all these moms are drunk parenting even though they don't know it."

So what's a new parent to do? Dr. Karp shared 10 tips from his book to get your baby to sleep. Keep scrolling and get ready for everyone in your home to start catching a few more Zs at night.

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16 PARENTING HACKS FOR NEWBORNS EVERY NEW PARENT NEEDS IN THEIR LIFE

By Gen Cohen

 

 

Image Source: Flickr user Mariela M.

Having a newborn is a crazy ride, but it doesn't last for that long (just remind yourself of that when you're looking for the light at the end of the sleep-deprived tunnel). To make this fleeting time in your and your baby's lives a bit smoother — so that you can focus on the cuddles and kisses — we have 16 parenting hacks for newborns that will help you along your way through new-mama-hood like a pro.

Scroll through our baby tips for new parents below!

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We Let Our Baby Cry It Out, and 10 Years Later, This Is What Happened

By Gen Cohen

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'12 Yoga Poses of Christmas' Can Ease Your Holiday Stress—Your Kid's Too!

By Gen Cohen

To jumpstart your routine, try practicing these family yoga poses by using the "Twelve Days of Christmas" song or with the acronyms PEACE, LOVE, and JOY.

By Teresa Anne Power

While the holidays are meant to bring feelings of love and cheer, they can also be a stressful time for many. Too many activities, even if they are fun ones, can be overwhelming and leave both kids and adults feeling frazzled rather than fulfilled. Taking the time to practice a few minutes of yoga every day during the holidays can go a long way to help alleviate the stress of the season.

More and more people are beginning to recognize the many health benefits of yoga for adults, but what they may not realize is that kids who practice yoga can receive the same advantages. Some of the diverse benefits include developing discipline, increasing focus and concentration, building balance and flexibility, promoting calmness, and easing stress.

Remember to pick a quiet place to do yoga, and focus on breathing in and out through the nose while practicing the postures; doing so increases lung capacity and helps prevent the fight-or-flight response that occurs from mouth breathing. Hold the poses anywhere from 8-15 seconds. Since it takes time to get into the poses, counting should begin once you are in the posture. As you get more proficient with the poses, you can slowly increase the time spent holding them.

To jumpstart your routine, try practicing the postures as a family by using the "Twelve Days of Christmas" song or with the acronyms PEACE, LOVE, and JOY. Start with the pretzel pose on the first day; on the second day, add easy pose; and gradually add all the poses to have a 12 posture yoga routine at the end of the 12 days. Let's get started with our 'Twelve Days of Christmas' yoga poses:

Twelve Days of Yoga

  1. On the first day of Christmas my true love gave to me, the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.
  2. On the second day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 2 easy poses, and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.
  3. On the third day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 3 airplane poses, 2 easy poses, and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.
  4. On the fourth day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 4 cobra poses, 3 airplane poses, 2 easy poses, and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.
  5. On the fifth day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 5 elephant poses, 4 cobra poses. 3 airplane poses, 2 easy poses, and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.
  6. On the sixth day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 6 Jack-in-the-box poses, 5 elephant poses, 4 cobra poses, 3 airplane poses, 2 easy poses, and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.
  7. On the seventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 7 otter poses, 6 Jack-in-the-box poses, 5 elephant poses, 4 cobra poses, 3 airplane poses, 2 easy poses, and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.
  8. On the eighth day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 8 Ys for yoga, 7 otter poses, 6 Jack-in-the-box poses, 5 elephant poses, 4 cobra poses, 3 airplane poses, 2 easy poses, and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.
  9. On the ninth day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 9 lion poses, 8 Ys for yoga, 7 otter poses, 6 Jack-in-the-box poses, 5 elephant poses, 4 cobra poses, 3 airplane poses, 2 easy poses, and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free
  10. On the tenth day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 10 oyster poses, 9 lion poses, 8 Ys for yoga, 7 otter poses, 6 Jack-in-the-box poses, 5 elephant poses, 4 cobra poses, 3 airplane poses, 2 easy poses and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.
  11. On the eleventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 11 volcano poses, 10 oyster poses, 9 lion poses, 8 Ys for yoga, 7 otter poses, 6 Jack-in-the-box poses, 5 elephant poses, 4 cobra poses, 3 airplane poses, 2 easy poses and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.
  12. On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love gave to me, 12 eagle poses, 11 volcano poses, 10 oyster poses, 9 lion poses, 8 Ys for yoga, 7 otter poses, 6 Jack-in-the-box poses, 5 elephant poses, 4 cobra poses, 3 airplane poses, 2 easy poses, and the pretzel pose to twist and feel free.

PEACE, LOVE and JOY acronyms

P is for Pretzel pose

E is for Easy pose

A is for Airplane pose

C is for Cobra pose

E is for Elephant pose

L is for Lion pose

O is for Oyster pose

V is for Volcano pose

E is for Eagle pose

J is for Jack-in-the-box pose

O is for Otter pose

Y is for Yoga pose

Images provided by ABC Yoga for Kids.

Teresa Anne Power is an internationally recognized expert on children's yoga and the author of the bestselling and award-winning book, "The ABCs of Yoga for Kids," which has been translated into four languages. Her newest book, "The ABCs of Yoga for Kids: A Guide for Parents and Teachers," is coming out on Kids' Yoga Day, which is on April 8, 2016. For more information, visit ABC Yoga for Kids.

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26 Easy, Wholesome Baby Food Recipes

By Gen Cohen

Check out this list from Parenting.com of 26 Wholesome Baby Food Recipes!

Easy, healthy snacks for babies and toddlers beyond Cheerios and bananas, from Boddler Bites: Food in a Flash.

Tags: Baby Food

From the editors of Parenting.com

A is for Avocado
Chop peeled avocado into bite-sized pieces. Puree crackers or chips in food processor. Pour over avocado pieces and gently toss.

Hoping to raise a natural baby? Read how!

B is for Beans
Puree (canned, rinsed) white beans with a little milk and stir into Alfredo sauce. Stir into prepared pasta.

C is for Cottage Cheese
Stir into scrambled eggs, prepared quinoa or pasta sauce.

D is for Desserts!
Like chocolate-covered banana treats—Drizzle organic, melted, semi-sweet chocolate chips over banana slices. 

E is for English Muffin
Preheat oven to 375ºF. Spread light canned tuna (drained & mixed with a little plain yogurt) on English muffin. Top with grated cheddar cheese. Bake for 8-10 minutes. 

F is for Fish Sticks
Preheat oven to 425ºF. Slice ½-pound cod, halibut or salmon fillets into 1-inch "fish stick" strips. On small plate, spread out 1/3 cup whole wheat flour. In small bowl, mix 2 eggs and 2 Tbsp. milk together. Lightly coat fish sticks in flour, then dredge in egg mixture and cover with ground, organic potato chips. Bake on greased baking sheet for 6-7 minutes per side, until cooked through. 

G is for Grapefruit
Cut grapefruit in half (crosswise), remove seeds and use serrated knife to separate sections. Sprinkle each side with 1/2 tsp. cinnamon and drizzle with 1 Tbsp. maple syrup. Broil on tray for 5 minutes. Scrape out grapefruit sections and serve warm. Top with vanilla yogurt if desired.  

H is for Hummus
Spread on crackers, toast or pita bread. 

I is for International Food!
Like French store bought crepes (in produce section) spread with any of the following and roll up: cream cheese, jam, diced fruit, yogurt, grated cheese, Nutella, nut butters, ricotta cheese, maple syrup or honey. Cut into pieces. 

J is for Jicama
Mix plain yogurt with mild salsa and use dip for jicama sticks. 

Preparation tip: Peel jicama with paring knife from top to bottom. Once peeled, rinse and pat dry; then cut through the middle. Lay flat and cut into strips. Steam until tender (to avoid potential choking hazard for young Boddlers). For older Boddlers, it’s delicious raw. Tastes like sweet carrots.

K is for Kale
Make kale chips! Wash and de-stem one bunch of kale. Pat dry. Toss in 1-2 Tbsp. olive oil, lightly coating both sides. Sprinkle lightly with sea salt. Place on greased cookie sheet and bake for 20 minutes on 300ºF. 

L is for Lemon Yogurt
Make lemon yogurt pancakes by preparing 1 cup whole grain pancake mix as directed. Stir in 1/2 cup lemon yogurt. Add a handful of fresh or frozen blueberries to batter, if desired. Cook as usual. 

M is for Milkshake
Make a berry milkshake by blending the following until smooth: 1 cup milk, 1 cup any flavor yogurt, 3/4 cup fresh/frozen berries and 1 tsp. honey. Add ground flaxseed or wheat germ if desired. 

N is for Nuts
Grind/chop and toss into cereal or yogurt. 

O is for Olives
Canned, jarred or fresh pitted olives. Rinse, drain and cut in quarters. 

P is for Pineapple
Mash diced pineapple pies with a little cream cheese. Spread on crackers.

Q is for Quinoa.
Make Quinoa Balls! Cook 1 cup quinoa according to package. Remove from heat. Stir in 2 Tbsp. butter, ½ cup shredded cheese and pinch of salt. Let cool. Form into mini, bite-sized balls. 

R is for Ravioli
Cook (whole wheat, if possible) ravioli as directed. Stir in pasta sauce or jarred pesto. Cut into bite-sized pieces. 

S is for Sugar Snap Peas
In medium bowl, toss 2 cups sugar snap peas (fresh or frozen) with 2 tsp. olive oil and 2 pinches of sea salt. Spread in one layer on greased cookie sheet. Bake at 425ºF for 6-8 minutes. 

T is for Tomato Soup
Cook ¼ cup dry lentils or open organic canned beans (rinse and drain). Puree ¼ cup lentils or beans with 1 tsp. olive oil until smooth. Stir into warmed, canned or boxed organic low sodium tomato soup. Top with grated cheese. 

U is for Under the Sea!
Let your baby try seafood, like canned salmon. Open a can of salmon and drain. Stir 2 Tbsp. salmon into prepared mac n' cheese, prepared pasta or a mashed and buttered sweet potato.

V is for Veggie Burger
Heat according to package, top with cheese and/or spread on some avocado. 

W is for Watermelon
Make watermelon soup by pureeing two cups watermelon, 1 cup strawberries and 1/4 cup vanilla yogurt. Serve chilled. 

X is for Xmas Dishes!
Buy boxed (ideally, organic) stuffing mix and prepare as directed on package. Stir in cooked, drained spinach or kale.  

Y is for Yams
Steam yams with peeled, diced apples, until tender. Mash with a little butter. 

Z is for Zucchini
Make your own zucchini fries. Preheat oven to 400ºF. Slice whole zucchini into "French fry" strips. Place strips on greased baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil and pinches of salt. Bake for 20-25 minutes. Let cool and serve. 

These yummy ideas were taken from Food in a Flash: Boddler Bites

As these homemade baby food ideas prove, snacks for Junior don't have to be a challenge, just like sun protection is easy as pie with Ro·Sham·Bo Baby sunglasses!

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11 Must-Have Products for Toddlers

By Gen Cohen

Your baby shower helped supply you with what you need for the first year of baby's life, but what about when you start the toddler years? Here are 11 must-have products to help you make it through with ease. Pssst! Be sure to read this list of 11 must-have toddler products all the way to the end!

Originally shared on parenting.com

Faucet Extender

Make handwashing even easier by attaching a faucet extender to the bathroom sink. The Aqueduck Single Handle Faucet Extender is a two-piece system that brings the water flow closer to the front of the sink and provides an extension to the faucet lever so kids can turn the water on and off easily after going potty. ($24.95)

 

Soft-Soled Shoes

Make sure those first steps are well supported. The soft soles of Robeez Shoes for toddlers promote balance by flexing and bending with each step. As a bonus, the elastic ankle feature ensures the tiny shoes stay in place, even on the most curious toddler. ($26)

 

Sippy Cups

Bye-bye bottles. Growing kids need to learn how to hold and drink from their own cups. Start with a Playtex Sipsters Stage 1 cup that features a soft silicone spout that makes it easy to transition from a nipple to a straw. The break-proof cup is molded to fit tiny toddler hands. ($7.99/2-count)

 

Training Pants

As soon as the potty becomes interesting, introduce your toddler to his or her first pair of washable big kid underwear. Gerber Training Pants feature covered elastic waistlines, making them easy for kids to pull up and down. Tucked inside are 100 percent cotton panels to absorb accidents. These training pants are available in sizes 18 months, 2T and 3T. ($15.99)

 

Bed Side Rail

After you've upgraded your crib escapee to a big kid bed, keep her safe with a protective side rail. The Babies R Us Extra Long Swing Down Bedrail features a 20-inch tall protective barrier that stretches 56-inches along the edge of the bed. When morning comes, simply fold down the rail until nap time. ($32.99)

 

Two-Piece Pajamas

Make evening and morning visits to the potty simpler with two-piece PJs that pull off and on easily. Carter's offers several adorable cotton top and polyester pants sets to keep kids warm and ready to use the potty at a moment's notice. ($15.99)

 

Potty Training Seat

Keep your little one safe and cozy during their time on the big potty. The Disappearing Potty Seat attaches to your existing toilet seat and tucks up into the lid via magnets when not in use. The slow-closing lid keeps little fingers from getting pinched. ($49.95–$59.95)

 

Two-Piece Swimsuits

Playing in the pool with a toddler can often mean frequent potty breaks. Keep trips to the bathroom quick and simple by slipping your little one into a two-piece swimsuit. The Cabana Life Swim Shorts and Rashguard Set also offers long sleeves for optimal sun protection. ($32.90)

 

Stepping Stool

Once your toddler discovers how to make those little legs move, he'll be everywhere! The Graco Molded Step Stool makes it easy for him to reach the big potty, wash his hands at the sink, help you at the kitchen counter, and get in and out of his big kid bed. This stool offers a no-slip grip for tiny toes to stay put and a non-skid bottom to keep the stool securely in place. ($14.19)

 

Bathtub Spout Cover

Rub a dub dub, if you don't want any bumps in the tub, cover the faucet. The Kel-Gar Tubbly Bubbly elephant- or hippo-shaped bathtub spout cover allows water to flow while protecting your toddler's fingers from hot metal faucet spouts or accidental bruises and bumps when playing near the fixture during bath time.($12.59)

 

Table Booster Seat

When your baby outgrows his high chair, move into an elevated booster seat. The Graco Blossom Booster Seat features safety straps to keep kids in place and a removable back insert to help safely position your child as he grows and fills the seat. This portable booster seat is perfect for use at home, in restaurants, or on visits to see friends and family. ($29.99)

 

...and bonus item, of course unbreakable toddler sunglasses from ro·sham·bo baby, like these teal kids' wayfarer sunglasses (pictured)!

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11 Ways to Save on After-School Activities

By Gen Cohen

Going broke funding your kid's extracurricular activities? Try these 11 tips on how to spend less on after-school extracurricular activities.

 

1. Register early

Fill out your child's registration paperwork and pay the fees as early as possible. Some organizations give a discount for early registration, and registering early gives you time to prepare for the activity so that you can accommodate it into your budget without last minute surprise expenses, says Clare K. Levison, author of Frugal Isn't Cheap: Spend Less, Save More, and Live Better. Another reason to get your child enrolled early: you don't have to worry about forgetting to do it in time and then having to pay a late registration fee!

2. Ask for a discount

Some activities offer a multi-child or sibling discount, but you may not get it if you don't ask. Even if you only have one child participating in the program, check if there are any other discounts for which your child or family might qualify. You never know. A program may give a small percentage off if you or your spouse are military or law enforcement, or if your child is on the honor roll at school. "It never hurts to ask for a discount because every little bit helps," Levison says.

3. Look for a coupon

Yep, you may be able to find a coupon for your child's baseball team or dance class. "Thanks to sites like Groupon and LivingSocial, there are coupons for just about everything now, including extracurricular activities," says Michael Catania, co-founder of the savings community PromotionCode.org. "Do a quick search for the activity along with the month and year (for example, Pony League Baseball, Las Vegas, August 2016 offers) to see if what discounts might be available before you register," he says. It's also a good idea to look for discount codes when shopping for uniforms, equipment and other required items. Even if it's only a 5 percent off or BOGO offer, those savings add up.

4. Volunteer or barter

Volunteering with the organization can often reduce or remove the participation fees for your child, says consumer and money-saving expert Andrea Woroch. "You can offer to help with bookkeeping, coaching, or cleaning a dance studio, or you could offer your professional skills, whether that be marketing or web design," she says. Whatever you do, it doesn't have to be too time-consuming. It could be as simple as running the concession stands once a week. Every little bit helps, so talk to the program coordinators to see if there are ways you can pitch in while also reducing your child's fees. A couple of bonuses: You get to spend more time with your child doing something he enjoys, and depending on the activity, you may even get in a mini-workout.

5. Do a trial run

It's frustrating and financially draining when your child asks to participate in something, you fork over the cash, and then she begs to quit a couple of weeks later. If you're not sure that your kid will stick with a particular activity, ask if there's a way to try it out before making a full commitment. Some organizations will let your child to attend a class or two on a trial basis. It may be at no cost, or you may have to pay a small fee. Either way, it will give you and your kid time to see if this is really an activity she wants to be involved in, without you having to pay (and possibly lose) the whole fee.

6. Think thrifty

Of course, there are some things that should only be purchased new (such as mouthguards and helmets), but for many other things, secondhand is just as good. Asking family, friends, or neighbors for hand-me-downs is a great way to score gently used items like cleats, uniforms, bats, and art supplies for free or cheap. Buying used can keep more money in your pocketbook too. Check out thrift stores, eBay, Craigslist, yard sales, consignment shops, resellers like Play it Again Sports, or swap sites like SwapMeSports.com. And don't think that buying used means your child will get beat up gear. "A lot of times people try something, decide they don't like it (see above!) and then they have a piece of equipment that's practically brand new that they don't have a use for anymore, so it ends up at a thrift store [or other resale shop]," says Levison.

7. Rent equipment

Rather than paying for instruments, which can be expensive, look into renting. You can likely find rental options locally or through an online dealer. Another possibility: your library. "Some libraries, particularly those in big cities, offer rentals of musical instruments with just your library card," Catania says. Since you obviously won't be able to keep a library rental for the full school year, this option is best when your child is undecided about which instrument she wants to play and trying out different options. Once she's found the instrument she likes, you can look into a long-term rental from a music store or online.

8. Make meals/snacks ahead of time

In addition to the costs of the activity, many families shell out extra cash on food and snacks. Think about it: When you're leaving a long day at work and then heading to this or that practice or game, the last thing you want to do is stand over a hot stove. So you load up on snacks at the concession stand or grab takeout on the way home—and increase your spending. "Usuallly we find we spend too much money when we find ourselves in a time crunch," Levison says. "So if you can plan your meals ahead, do your shopping at the beginning of the week, and plan easy but healthy meals on the nights you have activities, it can save a lot of time and money." 

9. Save on gas

Another area that many parents don't factor into their budget with extracurricular activities is the added travel expenses. "Organize carpools with other parents and take turns driving to practices, games, and performances," Woroch says. Since everyone's schedule is likely to be busy, reach out to others to try to create a game plan as early in the season as possible. When it's your turn to drive, make sure you save on gas. "Start off by finding the lowest local prices with an app like Gas Buddy—a crowd-sourced app that offers near up-to-the-minute gas prices sorted by zip code," Catania says. And most gas stations have affiliations with credit cards and grocery stores, so if you carry a card or shop at a specific store, look to see if it can help you lower your fuel expenses.

10. Skip the add-ons

Just because your child participates in an activity doesn't mean he has to have every little item the team offers for sale. "Professional photos, videos, and extra shirts are fun to have, but the costs can really add up," Levison says. So pass on things that aren't necessities. You can take your own photos or videos, and skip the team shirts for mom and dad and show your support by wearing the team colors instead. 

11. Just say "no" 

If your kid wants to do football, soccer and swim, you may have to give him a choice. "I think we tend to want to sign our kids up for a lot of organized activities these days, but you don't have to go overboard, especially if it's affecting your finances," Levison says. Limit your child to one activity per season, and tell him to choose the one he wants to do most. If he has an interest in something else, he can do it at home or find a community center that is more affordable than, says, private art lessons. Sure, there may be some whining (or even tears), but you have to do what's right for your financial situation. And, add Levinson, this is a good opportunity to something else that's beneficial to your child: have a conversation about budgets and the cost of activities.

 

With savings like these, you can treat you and your kiddos to rad rosmbo shades! While your kids are out playing, make sure their eyes are safe! Added bonus that our shades are unbreakable.

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