News: best kids sunnies

The 9 Moms You'll Meet at the Pool This Summer

By Gen Cohen

 

The one thing these 9 types of pool moms should have in common is caring about sun protection for their children. 

Unless you're one of those lucky moms who live by a beach, odds are, you and your kiddos will spend quite a few days at the pool this Summer. Full of lifeguard-suited teenagers, gangs of splashing kids, and moms jockeying for the best lounge chairs, the pool can make for a totally fun or completely stressful experience, often depending on the age of your kids and your own pool personality. As a mom of a 4-year-old fearless, but not yet competent, swimmer and an 18-month-old wild man, a day at my local pool usually instills more feelings of anxiety than excitement for me. Will my daughter listen when I tell her to stay close? Answer: almost definitely no. Will my son's swim diapers hold up? So far, thankfully, yes. While taking my kids to the pool can certainly be stress-inducing, it's almost always good for some people watching, and I've noticed nine distinct types of pool moms. Which one are you?

  1. The completely overwhelmed mom. She's toting a baby and a toddler, and she's not yet sure whether this trip to the pool was a great idea or the worst one she's ever had. (Her husband advised her to rethink the plan multiple times.) She spends two hours chasing her toddler around the shallow end while her baby tries to pull down her swimsuit top then decides to call it a day.
  2. The golden years mom. She's sitting in a lounge chair, reading the book of the Summer, with not a care in the world, except whether her iced tea might be running low. Her strong-swimming children are quite content playing with their friends all day while she reads, chats with friends, and maybe takes a dip or two. The kids find her when they need money or a snack, she obliges, then they head out again. She's the standard all other moms are trying to reach.
  3. The well-stocked mom. Need sunscreen, swim diapers, goggles, or pool toys? She's got them all, plus cut-up sandwiches, juice boxes, and even an extra towel or two. She puts a lot of thought into packing her extralarge pool bag, and this year, she added a cooler to the mix. Waters and freezer pops for everyone!
  4. The gym-rat mom. She spends nine months of the year Spinning, running, and doing interval training so that she looks amazing in a bikini, and now is her time to show off that body. Feel free to express your jealousy; she doesn't mind at all.
  5. The lifeguard mom. She isn't really interested in getting wet, but she doesn't trust her kids left to their own devices. You'll find her standing sentry on the side. If only the real lifeguards would lend her a whistle.
  6. The sun-worshipping mom. A former tanning-booth devotee, she's here for one reason and one reason only: to get a tan. Like the gym-rat mom, she's probably wearing as little as possible, both in terms of clothing and SPF. By mid-Summer, she'll be almost uncomfortably brown, and she'll love every single tan line.
  7. The sunscreen-wielding mom. This mom believes in applying 50+ SPF as often as possible. You'll often see her chasing around her kids, who are also wearing full-sleeved rash guards, floppy hats, and water shoes, with hands full of lotion. Otherwise, you'll find her safely ensconced under an umbrella.
  8. The deep-end mom. Who says kids should have all the fun? You'll find this mom in line for the slide, playing games in the deep end, and doing laps during adult swim. A former camp counselor and swim-team member, this is the season that she loves most, and she's soaking up every minute.
  9. The time-to-go mom. She's been trying, unsuccessfully, to round up her kids for more than an hour, and really, "It's time to go." But maybe, just maybe, she'll bring them back tomorrow.

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6 Best Dog Breeds For Families With Small Kids

By Gen Cohen

It's not unusual for families to adopt a dog around the same time as having their own children. But are some dog breeds better suited for families with small children? We were recently asked that, so we reached out to Dr. Eva Radke, DVM, of the East San Rafael Veterinary Clinic in California to see what we could come up with.

There are various things to consider, according to Radke, aside from a dog just being a family-friendly breed. She recommends taking your own daily life into account. "Are you an active family who spends a lot of time hiking, running, and camping?" she asks. "Or do you tend to stay home cooking and enjoying movies? You will want to choose a dog whose temperament, size, and energy level best matches your family."

At the end of the day, it's also important to remember that your dog is just that: a dog. "Even the gentlest-mannered dog is still an animal with her own set of instincts and ways to express herself," Radke said. She suggests you never leave your small children unattended with the dog, just in case, and always supervise them when they're together. Your pup may always tolerate the ear and tail tugs from your kid, but you don't want to run the risk of the dog snapping one day when you aren't paying attention.

Scroll through to find the six best dog breeds for families with kids, based on each breed's typical personality traits.

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We Let Our Baby Cry It Out, and 10 Years Later, This Is What Happened

By Gen Cohen

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18 TIPS FOR TRAVELING WITH A BABY

By Gen Cohen

Before we dive into this helpful article by Colleen Lanin, it's important to note that whether your vacation goes to beach or snow, protecting your kid's eyes is extremely important, and Ro·Sham·Bo Baby's baby polarized sunglasses are perfect for the job! Check out our pink and white kids' Wayfarer sunglasses!

Have a fun and stress-free vacation with baby by navigating on-the-go naps, time differences and cramped hotel rooms.

By Colleen Lanin via parenting.com

 

Does "vacationing" with your baby sound like an oxymoron? As someone who has ventured on road trips, beach getaways, cruises and more with my two kids, and who is writing a book about family travel—The Travel Mamas' Guide—I know that vacations now are not as easy as they were prebaby. And while there are tons of tips on how to get there, there's not much advice for how to manage once you arrive. A few simple tricks have saved some of my family's trips.

Strategic Unpacking

Just as important as what you pack—and you can check out get-ready checklists here—in my opinion, is how you unpack.

Do it immediately

As soon as you arrive (unless someone in the family is overly cranky or tired), set up your room to make it as close to home as possible. Put the baby in the playpen or hotel crib with a pile of toys and occupy an older kid with a coloring book. Or have your partner take the older sibling out to get the lay of the land while you unpack. Settling in will help you remain organized (and sane) throughout your stay.

Designate a baby-changing station

Bring a box of wipes, lay out a changing pad (I like to put a disposable changing pad on top of a hotel towel) and stack a bunch of diapers in one area. That way, you won't need to chase down the diaper bag when that first big poop occurs.

Create a play space...

Stash toys and books on a low shelf or in a drawer, or keep all the playthings in one corner. Creating a place for your baby to play will make the room feel homey and keep it from looking like a disaster area.

...and a kitchen

Even if your room doesn't have a kitchen or bar area, establish a spot where you'll keep bottles, dishes, baby food, snacks, formula and dish soap. Sometimes the bathroom is best if it has the only sink in the room.

Napping Smarts

Your baby needs her naps, but you don't want to spend your whole vacation watching her snooze. Follow these strategies for squeezing in that daytime sleep:

Start walking

When my daughter, Karissa, was a baby, she wouldn't nap in a strange crib while on vacation. So we planned our days around taking long walks with her napping in a stroller. Some moms advise bringing the lightest, most compact umbrella stroller on vacation to save room, but I always pack a stroller that reclines completely to make stroller slumber easier.

Wear your baby

If your baby doesn't sleep well in a stroller, try a front carrier (like the BabyBjorn) or baby backpack. If you've never used one at home but think it might be convenient on vacation, try it out a few times before you leave. Not all babies will like it, and it might be too hard on your back.

Go for a scenic drive

Try taking leisurely drives to check out the area while your baby naps in the car seat. And on some trips, you can coordinate drive time between destinations with sleep time.

Take turns nap-sitting

If your tot isn't an in-transit sleeper, don't be afraid to schedule naps back in the room. While it's a different vacation rhythm than you're probably used to, an a.m. break and midday siesta can be relaxing for you, too. Just consider your baby's napping style when booking accommodations; if you'll need to return to the room often, a hotel near the beach may be a better bet than a spot farther away, even if it's a bit pricier. If you can, book a room with a balcony or patio so the parent "on duty" can enjoy the outdoors, too.

Easier Bedtimes

One of the most worrisome things about traveling with a baby is getting your tot to sleep in a new place. Here's how to up your odds of at least a few peaceful nights:

Do some trial runs

If you're bringing a portable travel bed, have your baby sleep in it for a few nights before you leave. That way, it will feel like a familiar, comfy spot to go night-night on vacation.

Give it a few days

While it can be tempting to throw in the blankie and drive home in the middle of a sleepless vacation night with an inconsolable baby, I implore you to power through. Eventually, babies will adjust to their new surroundings and schedule, and sleep. If you can survive a couple of nights, I am (almost) willing to promise happy vacation days ahead.

Book the right room(s)

If bedding down in the same room means no one will get any sleep, consider booking a suite or connecting rooms. A suite may offer the convenience of a kitchen area, but connecting rooms may afford more space at a cheaper price.

Stick to the routine

If your baby's bedtime ritual at home includes a bath, lullabies and a bottle, do the same on vacation to make up for the change in location.

Get adjusted

Instead of expecting your infant to shift her internal clock and adjust to a new time zone, shift your day: Stay up later or get up earlier than usual by a few hours.

Meals on Wheels

Sampling local cuisine and splurging on restaurant meals are vacation pleasures I refuse to give up. Dining with babies can be done.

Breakfast in Bed

Because our times to swim, hike, shop or visit an aquarium are limited by morning and afternoon naps, it makes sense for the entire family to eat something quick in the hotel room. So we pack plenty of ready-made breakfast foods like mini-bagels, cereal bars and fruit (bananas, apples).

BYOF

If your baby drinks formula, it helps to pack more than you think you'll need. To save space, empty powdered formula into zipper-lock plastic bags. Or order heavy staples like diapers and formula—even baby shampoo—from a site such as diapers.com or Babiestravellite.com that will ship to your destination (and since you won't have to carry the formula, consider splurging on the ready-to-feed type).

Nurse wherever you feel comfortable

You can breastfeed anywhere you are legally allowed to be.

Bend the rules

To enjoy dinners out, you may have to encourage what you would normally consider bad behavior. I don't let my kids watch TV while eating at home, but we always bring portable DVD players when we eat out. Putting on some Sesame Street for them allows us to actually taste the food we're shelling out big bucks for.

Eat early

Sure, a romantic dinner would normally be at 8 p.m., but by dining out at 5:30, you'll likely have an empty restaurant, room to park your stroller, and a short wait for your food. Alternatively, if your newborn loves to sleep in her car seat, make later reservations and then feed her a bottle or nurse her while you wait for your appetizers. Hopefully, she'll be out for the rest of the meal.

 

Now, go enjoy! Toss out all your old ideas about what a vacation should be and embrace the new craziness that is traveling with a baby. Laugh at the fact that you're at the local playground by 6 a.m. and in bed for the night at 8 p.m. Consider all the gear and baby-lugging as great vacation exercise. And then savor going back home to "regular" life that much more.

Colleen Lanin is the creator of Travelmamas.com.

 

www.roshambobaby.com

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22 Outdoor Activities Perfect For Fall Weekends

By Gen Cohen

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11 Ways to Save on After-School Activities

By Gen Cohen

Going broke funding your kid's extracurricular activities? Try these 11 tips on how to spend less on after-school extracurricular activities.

 

1. Register early

Fill out your child's registration paperwork and pay the fees as early as possible. Some organizations give a discount for early registration, and registering early gives you time to prepare for the activity so that you can accommodate it into your budget without last minute surprise expenses, says Clare K. Levison, author of Frugal Isn't Cheap: Spend Less, Save More, and Live Better. Another reason to get your child enrolled early: you don't have to worry about forgetting to do it in time and then having to pay a late registration fee!

2. Ask for a discount

Some activities offer a multi-child or sibling discount, but you may not get it if you don't ask. Even if you only have one child participating in the program, check if there are any other discounts for which your child or family might qualify. You never know. A program may give a small percentage off if you or your spouse are military or law enforcement, or if your child is on the honor roll at school. "It never hurts to ask for a discount because every little bit helps," Levison says.

3. Look for a coupon

Yep, you may be able to find a coupon for your child's baseball team or dance class. "Thanks to sites like Groupon and LivingSocial, there are coupons for just about everything now, including extracurricular activities," says Michael Catania, co-founder of the savings community PromotionCode.org. "Do a quick search for the activity along with the month and year (for example, Pony League Baseball, Las Vegas, August 2016 offers) to see if what discounts might be available before you register," he says. It's also a good idea to look for discount codes when shopping for uniforms, equipment and other required items. Even if it's only a 5 percent off or BOGO offer, those savings add up.

4. Volunteer or barter

Volunteering with the organization can often reduce or remove the participation fees for your child, says consumer and money-saving expert Andrea Woroch. "You can offer to help with bookkeeping, coaching, or cleaning a dance studio, or you could offer your professional skills, whether that be marketing or web design," she says. Whatever you do, it doesn't have to be too time-consuming. It could be as simple as running the concession stands once a week. Every little bit helps, so talk to the program coordinators to see if there are ways you can pitch in while also reducing your child's fees. A couple of bonuses: You get to spend more time with your child doing something he enjoys, and depending on the activity, you may even get in a mini-workout.

5. Do a trial run

It's frustrating and financially draining when your child asks to participate in something, you fork over the cash, and then she begs to quit a couple of weeks later. If you're not sure that your kid will stick with a particular activity, ask if there's a way to try it out before making a full commitment. Some organizations will let your child to attend a class or two on a trial basis. It may be at no cost, or you may have to pay a small fee. Either way, it will give you and your kid time to see if this is really an activity she wants to be involved in, without you having to pay (and possibly lose) the whole fee.

6. Think thrifty

Of course, there are some things that should only be purchased new (such as mouthguards and helmets), but for many other things, secondhand is just as good. Asking family, friends, or neighbors for hand-me-downs is a great way to score gently used items like cleats, uniforms, bats, and art supplies for free or cheap. Buying used can keep more money in your pocketbook too. Check out thrift stores, eBay, Craigslist, yard sales, consignment shops, resellers like Play it Again Sports, or swap sites like SwapMeSports.com. And don't think that buying used means your child will get beat up gear. "A lot of times people try something, decide they don't like it (see above!) and then they have a piece of equipment that's practically brand new that they don't have a use for anymore, so it ends up at a thrift store [or other resale shop]," says Levison.

7. Rent equipment

Rather than paying for instruments, which can be expensive, look into renting. You can likely find rental options locally or through an online dealer. Another possibility: your library. "Some libraries, particularly those in big cities, offer rentals of musical instruments with just your library card," Catania says. Since you obviously won't be able to keep a library rental for the full school year, this option is best when your child is undecided about which instrument she wants to play and trying out different options. Once she's found the instrument she likes, you can look into a long-term rental from a music store or online.

8. Make meals/snacks ahead of time

In addition to the costs of the activity, many families shell out extra cash on food and snacks. Think about it: When you're leaving a long day at work and then heading to this or that practice or game, the last thing you want to do is stand over a hot stove. So you load up on snacks at the concession stand or grab takeout on the way home—and increase your spending. "Usuallly we find we spend too much money when we find ourselves in a time crunch," Levison says. "So if you can plan your meals ahead, do your shopping at the beginning of the week, and plan easy but healthy meals on the nights you have activities, it can save a lot of time and money." 

9. Save on gas

Another area that many parents don't factor into their budget with extracurricular activities is the added travel expenses. "Organize carpools with other parents and take turns driving to practices, games, and performances," Woroch says. Since everyone's schedule is likely to be busy, reach out to others to try to create a game plan as early in the season as possible. When it's your turn to drive, make sure you save on gas. "Start off by finding the lowest local prices with an app like Gas Buddy—a crowd-sourced app that offers near up-to-the-minute gas prices sorted by zip code," Catania says. And most gas stations have affiliations with credit cards and grocery stores, so if you carry a card or shop at a specific store, look to see if it can help you lower your fuel expenses.

10. Skip the add-ons

Just because your child participates in an activity doesn't mean he has to have every little item the team offers for sale. "Professional photos, videos, and extra shirts are fun to have, but the costs can really add up," Levison says. So pass on things that aren't necessities. You can take your own photos or videos, and skip the team shirts for mom and dad and show your support by wearing the team colors instead. 

11. Just say "no" 

If your kid wants to do football, soccer and swim, you may have to give him a choice. "I think we tend to want to sign our kids up for a lot of organized activities these days, but you don't have to go overboard, especially if it's affecting your finances," Levison says. Limit your child to one activity per season, and tell him to choose the one he wants to do most. If he has an interest in something else, he can do it at home or find a community center that is more affordable than, says, private art lessons. Sure, there may be some whining (or even tears), but you have to do what's right for your financial situation. And, add Levinson, this is a good opportunity to something else that's beneficial to your child: have a conversation about budgets and the cost of activities.

 

With savings like these, you can treat you and your kiddos to rad rosmbo shades! While your kids are out playing, make sure their eyes are safe! Added bonus that our shades are unbreakable.

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Sun protection beyond the shades

By Gen Cohen

Sun protection beyond the shades

10 Safe Sunscreens For Kids (Including Some You Can Find at Your Drugstore)

Repost from PopSugar
Written by Rebecca Gruber

Slather on the lotion! If you thought the breast vs. bottle debate was polarizing, wait until you talk to fellow playground moms about sunscreen for children. Though lotions and sticks protect little ones' skin from cancer-causing UVA and UVB rays, doctors advise new mamas to use physical barriers — SPF clothing, umbrellas, and shades (like our ro•sham•bo sunglasses!) — rather than lotions on babies younger than 6 months old.

Once tots reach the 6-month mark, though, we need to keep them protected from the sun without harming them in other ways. The Environmental Working Group's recommendations for the best sunscreens for tots — products that do not contain potential hormone disruptors — is considered the definitive list of safe options. According to EWG Senior Scientist David Andrews, it's inactive ingredients like retinyl palmitate (vitamin A) and oxybenzone that parents need to look out for. "By and large, the ones that do well in our database are the ones that are mineral-based products with a higher percent of zinc oxide, as well as some of the products with titanium dioxide," he said.

While parents have been getting the message about switching from chemical sunscreens for children to mineral versions, one of the group's biggest concerns is how parents are using them. "[Consumers] are looking to buy higher and higher SPF values," Andrews said. "When people use higher SPF values, we're concerned that it leads to a change in behavior and an increased time in the sun and that you apply less of it. Those products may not be as effective in blocking both UVA and UVB radiation. So we steer consumers toward SPF 30 to SPF 50 products and lower and we really think those are the sweet spot of the products that are available in the marketplace."

He went on to explain, "The active ingredients in SPF 30 and SPF 100 products may be quite similar. So we're going to be doing more over the course of the next year, investigating the inactive ingredients like the antioxidants and anti-inflammatories that may be reducing redness in the skin, but may not be reducing how much hits your skin. The way the SPF test is done is in changes in skin redness."

So what's a parent to do when trying to choose a safe sunscreen for children? First, check the EWG's site and app for a list of the safest and least safe options for your family. If you don't have that at your fingertips, Andrews recommends:

  1. Steering away from SPF products over 50. SPF 30-50 products depending on the situation are OK.
  2. Seek out products that use three percent avobenzone if they are chemical sunscreens or the ones that use zinc oxide as the active ingredient in natural versions. "[They] do the best job of filtering out UVA radiation across the spectrum of UVA radiation. Seek out products that use a higher percentage of zinc oxide — typically you'll find 15 to 20 percent, or three percent avobenzone."
  3. Look at inactive ingredients on the label. If possible, avoid products that use retinyl palmitate (vitamin A) and avoid products using oxybenzone.
  4. Avoid spray products — they're convenient but not the best choice. Why skip the convenience of spray lotions? "You don't get a uniform coating on the skin," Andrews says. Plus, "Given the concern about the ingredients in these products, we really don't want to coat the inside of our lungs with sunscreen."

Read through to see these 10 safe sunscreens for kids (many of which can be found at your local drugstore — not just at specialty stores).

 

1. Drugstore Find: Aveeno Baby Natural Protection Mineral Block Face Stick, SPF 50

One of the highest-rated drugstore brand sunscreens on the market, Aveeno Baby Natural Protection Mineral Block Face Stick ($10) is a mineral-based sunscreen using both zinc oxide and titanium dioxide to block the sun's rays. Plus, in stick form, it's easy to apply to squirmy tots and it fits nicely inside a diaper bag.

 

2. Amazon Find: Adorable Baby Sunscreen Lotion, SPF 30+

Adorable Baby's zinc-oxide-based Sunscreen Lotion, SPF 30+ ($19) does not use any synthetic ingredients. The formula earns high UVA protection and balance of UVA protection in relation to the SPF on the EWG list.

 

3. Drugstore Find: California Baby Super Sensitive Sunscreen, SPF 30+

California Baby continues to manufacture safe and effective baby products that won't harm your tots. Its California Baby Super Sensitive Sunscreen, SPF 30+ ($21) is one of the highest rated on the EWG's annual list, due to its 12 percent titanium dioxide formula.

 

4. Sephora (and Online) Find: Hampton Sun Sunscreen Lotion For Baby, SPF 45

A favorite brand of jet-setting moms, Hampton Sun is now gracing the bodies of their little ones thanks to its Hampton Sun Sunscreen Lotion For Baby, SPF 45 ($28). A zinc- (12 percent) and titanium- (six percent) based formula, Hampton Sun's baby lotion receives a high EWG rating due to its good UVA protection and its balance of UVA protection in relation to the SPF.

 

5. Health Food Store Find: Badger Kids Sunscreen Cream, SPF 30

One of the highest-rated sunscreens on the EWG list (it has a low health concern), Badger'sKids Sunscreen Cream ($16) is certified natural, using zinc oxide (18.75 percent) as a blocker and sunflower oil as its base for easy application.

 

6. Thinksport Kid's Safe Sunscreen SPF 50+

Thinkbaby, which was already known for its popular bottles and sippy cups, just received an extremely high rating from the EWG for its Thinksport Kid's Safe Sunscreen SPF 50+ ($10). The zinc-oxide-based sun blocker does not contain any nanoparticles, making it safe for babies and big kids alike.

 

7. Amazon Find: Sunology Natural Sunscreen, Kids, SPF 50

A natural, chemical-free sunscreen, Sunology Natural Sunscreen, Kids, SPF 50 ($15) uses a mixture of titanium dioxide (7.5 percent) and zinc oxide (10 percent) to keep skin safe. Thehighly rated lotion is available in a travel size for families on the go.

 

8. Baby Store Find: Blue Lizard Australian Baby Sunscreen SPF 30+

Blue Lizard's Australian Baby Sunscreen SPF 30+ ($19) is made specifically for kids' sensitive skin and uses zinc oxide (10 percent) and titanium oxide (five percent) for sun blockage. It received the EWG's good rating for its UVA protection.

 

9. Baby Store Find: TruKid Sunny Days Sport Sunscreen, SPF 30+

TruKid Sunny Days Mineral All Natural Sunscreen ($19) is quickly becoming a favorite of parents and kids alike. The mineral-based lotion, which uses zinc oxide as its sunblock,received the EWG's highest rating for its nontoxic, nonnano, and gluten-free formula.

 

10. Costco Find: The Honest Company Honest Mineral Sunscreen, SPF 50+

After a misstep last year, The Honest Company is back with a new sunscreen that not only makes the grade with consumers, but is earning high ratings from the EWG. Their new Honest Mineral Sunscreen, SPF 50+ ($14) is a zinc oxide-based product (19 percent) that provides excellent UVA protection and reportedly has better spreadability than the company's previous iteration.

 

And for what you can't protect with sunscreen, protect with our 100% UVA/B/C baby, junior, and adult sunglasses for the whole family! 

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how to stay cool with baby this summer!

By Gen Cohen

17 Items for Keeping Cool This Summer

Nursery Items

HALO Cotton Muslin Sleepsack ~ $20

For hot summer nights, a lightweight wearable blanket (or swaddle) is a must for little ones who still need something to cover them. 100% cotton muslin fabric is breathable and very lightweight.

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Lasko Baby-Safe Tower Fan  ~ $61

Tower FanIf your nursery doesn’t have an overhead fan, we recommend this blade-less tower fan.

Safe for little fingers, an oscillating fan is also great because it circulates air without concentrating it in one spot. We also love that it helps with air quality. Remote included.

*Note this is just a fan, not an air conditioner.

 

buy-now

 

Baby Carriers

Just because it’s hotter than h*ll outside, doesn’t mean you should stop babywearing. Here are the carriers that we love for summer —

ventus-baby-carrier

Ergobaby Ventus

Ergobaby Cool Air Mesh/Performance Carriers ~ $120+

For babywearing in a warm/hot climate, I highly recommend the Ergo Performance line. They offer the “Cool Air Mesh Performance” carrier ($120), the “Performance Ventus” carrier (for ultimate ventilation) ($123) and the “360 Cool Air,” which is the regular 360 (which allows outward facing), but mo’ meshy ($180).

These carriers are all moisture-wicking and super breathable. The fabric is machine washable and fast drying. *Read more about why we love Ergobaby carriers here.

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Lillebaby Complete All Seasons ~ $140

Get more bang for your buck with the Lillebaby All Seasons carrier. In hot weather, zip down the front flap to allow air through the meshy back area. In the wintertime, zip it back up to keep baby warm in cold weather. For year-round warm climates, check out their new line of Airflow carriers.

Options, people!!

*Read in-depth review of this carrier here.

Lillebaby All Seasons Carrier

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Beachfront Baby Wrap ~ $40

This super light and stretchy infant wrap is made of performance athletic mesh, which is extremely breathable, lightweight and fast-drying – you can even babywear in the water. These are SO cool, I wish I knew about them when my littles were little!!

beachfront baby wraps

It’s also great for moms with older kid(s) that need an extra hand in the water. Perfect for everyday use as well. Comes in wrap and ring sling versions.

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Car Seat & Stroller Accessories

The interior of a car can get up to 170° on a hot day, which leaves every surface as hot as lava. The darker your car seats, the hotter they will get. Here are some tools for keeping your little ones cool(er) in the car and stroller.

Newbie Shade ~ $25

Don’t let the sun get between your baby and a much-needed car nap (right??).

The Newbie shade is low-profile, low-tech and easy to attach to the front and rear headrests. Made of 100% cotton, it blocks UV rays, works in nearly any vehicle and doesn’t interfere with the driver’s line of sight.

Enter promo code LUCIESLIST for 20% off at checkout through 9/22/16.

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Muslin Car Seat Cover ~ $15+

For infant car seats: muslin car seat covers are airy, breathable, and keep direct sun out of baby’s eyes. There are so many out there, it’s hard to pick just one. Check out the many options that are available at various price points.

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Brica Infant Car Seat Cover ~ $23

The highly-rated Brica infant car seat cover does double duty: it has mesh (to keep the bugs away) and a retractable sun & rain cover that blocks all UV rays. Oh, and it protects baby from unwanted touching 😉  *Fits all major car seat brands.

Brica Car Seat Cover

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Protect-A-Bub Convertible Car Seat Shade

And for the convertible car seat, Protect-A-Bub makes a cover for your older kiddo. Rated UPF 50+ and doesn’t retain heat.

*Click here to find a retailer in your area. Not so easy to find…

Protect a bub car seat shade

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Jolly Jumper Stroller Sunshade ~ $15

Strollers come with a built-in canopy, but most of them don’t cover your entire kiddo. We like the Jolly Jumper sunshade because it fits most strollers, play yards and protects against UV rays. Keeps bugs out too!

Jolly Jumper Stroller Sunshade

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Cool Mee Seat Liner by Meeno Babies

Cool Mee Seat LinerTypical car seats have a solid back surface or a cushion with material that isn’t vented, so setting a layer of vented material between the car seat or stroller and the child reduces sweating and overheating. In a hot, hot car, it may not guarantee against any sweating, but it sure does help.

One user noted that Meeno Babies car seat liner reduced surface temperature by about 18 degrees in the shade and 15 degrees in direct light (yes, he measured with a thermometer).

*Universal size fits most. Be sure this liner (or any other item) doesn’t interfere with harness placement and tightness. Harnesses should always be snug enough that you can’t pinch any material (95% of parents don’t have their kids harnessed tightly enough anyway — just saying).

Enter code staycool at checkout to get 20% off MSRP each unit until July 31st. Includes free shipping in the USA!

Dreambaby Stroller Fan ~ $13

Stroller fans don’t give off a ton of air, but it’s just the right amount for little ones. Bonus: it doubles as a sound machine 😉

*Another option is a handheld spray bottle fan; check out this one by 02cool. For the heavy duty user, check out this pump mister.

Dreambaby Stroller Fan

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Car Sunshades by Veneev ~ $12 (2-pack)

Window clings keep direct sun out of eyes and help keep the temperature down. *Be sure they don’t interfere with the driver’s line of sight.

These are the highest-rated shades on the market and use static to stick to your window without leaving residue. They protect from UV rays and provide a SPF 30+ protection. Note that you have to remove the cling in order to roll the window down.

*Check out Enovoe for larger cars.

Window Cling

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The Noggle Air Conditioner Extender ~ $46

These funny-looking air hoses are called Noggles and parents swear by them. They deliver air to anywhere in your car, especially to rear-facing kiddos who don’t get direct ventilation.  Works with a/c in the summer and heat in the winter, huzzah! Great for older cars that don’t have back seat vents.

*Note: You’ll need the 6′ for forward-facing in the backseat, the 8′ for rear-facing, and the 10′ for a car seat in the 3rd row.

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Cooling Garment

Cooling Towel by Ergodyne ~ $8

More tools for keeping cool: the best-selling Cooling Towel by Ergodyne. All you need to do is wet it (run it under the tap for one minute), and you can re-use it throughout the day. Bring this one to Disney in August, you won’t regret it.

Cooling Towel

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Insulated Cups

Polar Bottle Kids Insulated Bottle ~ $7.99

This affordable plastic bottle uses special insulated foil to keep liquids cold. Unlike heavy stainless steel water bottles, this one’s easy for little ones to drink from and the opening is large enough to fit ice. We have 3 and use them almost daily.

      • BPA and Phthalate free, dishwasher and freezer safe

polar bottle insulated

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Thermos Funtainer 12 oz ~ $15

Drinking lukewarm water in the heat is no fun. The Thermos Funtainer is highly-rated and for good reason — it’s vacuum insulated for up to 12 hours (for cooling only).

*Thermos also makes a Foogo 10 oz for $16 (similar) and a Foogo 7 oz spouted with handles ($19) for little ones. [Related: Favorite Sippy Cups]

Thermos Funtainer

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Hydro Flask Insulated Water Bottle ~ $50

Another very highly-rated insulated bottle (but for triple the cost), is the Hydro Flask. It keeps drinks cold for up to 24 hours AND it keeps drinks hot for up to 6 hours.

      • For every bottle purchased, Hydro Flask donates 5% back to a charity of your choice.

Hydro Flask

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That is all — enjoy!!

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